Contrast Treatments

Hot. Cold. Hot. Cold. Hot. Cold. Yes, that’s a simple as it gets. Contrast Treatments are powerful, quick, and easy ways to help with impaired circulation, arthritis, edema, headaches, infections, strains and sprains, and much more. Within a few moments of watching this short video, you can be applying contrast treatments yourself. Why not?

Using a Heating Compress

A heating compress is a cold wet cloth applied to a part of the body and covered with soft wool flannel. After a brief cooling stage the body increases circulation in the area which warms the compress and gives the effect of a mild application of heat. This increase in circulation continues for the entire time it takes to dry the wet cloth.

You may use heating compresses for a sore throat or tonsillitis, for colds, pneumonia, whooping cough, croup, and similar illnesses. Applied to a joint it may help in reducing pain and inflammation of arthritis or rheumatic fever.

As the compress is worn sweating generally occurs, this will also assist in muscle relaxation. The heating compress is left for several hours or over night.

When the compress is removed apply cold to the area to finish the treatment.

Articles needed for heating compress:

  1. Cotton cloth of at least two thicknesses (a 2” wide strip for neck compress)
  2. Soft wool flannel cloth that will be wrapped over the cotton cloth
  3. Safety pins
  4. Wool flannel vest for chest application

Procedure:

  1. Wring cotton cloth from cold water and apply to the area desired (neck for sore throat, chest or other affected area)
  2. Cover well with wool flannel, fit snugly but not too tightly; it must be comfortable
  3. Pin securely taking care to protect the person by placing your fingers inside the compress while pinning
  4. Use the compress for at least 30 minutes, normally overnight
  5. When removing the compress wipe the area with a cold wet cloth and dry thoroughly
Comments ( 10 ) Leave a Comment
  1. 1 Jill May 31, 2013, 3:11 PM PDT

    Can you explain how this treatment can be used on a knee joint?  It’s not easy to dip a knee joint into bowls of water!  Thanks

  2. 2 Felecia May 31, 2013, 4:12 PM PDT

    I have the same question as Jill. I am looking forward to trying this. I’ll need that thermometer first. Thanks!

  3. 3 Gilles May 31, 2013, 5:02 PM PDT

    i want to share that info about knee arthritis to a friend so waiting for the answer as Jill and Felicia

  4. 4 Deedee May 31, 2013, 6:15 PM PDT

    where do you get a water thermometer?

  5. 5 Bixby Jun 1, 2013, 6:20 AM PDT

    Excellent presentation! I will try it now. Happy Sabbath!

  6. 6 Carolyn Jun 1, 2013, 8:11 AM PDT

    Dr. Smith, I have been on a diet(vegan) given by one of your service providers(I do not know if I can use names) since September 2012.  My sed rate was 75-50 for 30 years due to arthritis.  It is now 16. No more drugs. That is progress!!  Thank you for the Newstart programs. Callie

  7. 7 James Jun 2, 2013, 9:27 PM PDT

    The lady in the demonstration said the sequence is 3min hot and 30 sec cold
    The Gentlemen said 3min hot and 1min cold
    Which one is correct
    Regards

  8. 8 Jill Jun 2, 2013, 10:25 PM PDT

    Here is the reply I received for those interested….
    For the knee joint, it would work best to use a 100% cotton hand or bath towel dipped in hot water and rung out till there is no drips.  Place on the knee until it starts to cool.  You ideally want it hot for 3 minutes, but you may need to apply two towels to accomplish that time.  Then get another cotton towel that is dipped in cold (ice) water, wring it out and place it on the knee for 30 seconds.  Repeat this 3-4 times. Obviously, make sure the hot towel is not hot enough to burn.  If it stings, it is too hot.

  9. 9 Chan Jun 3, 2013, 3:38 AM PDT

    Thank you for this presentation. What is the reason that contrast baths are not recommended for people with cancers? Does the type of tumor matter?

  10. 10 Daisy Jun 3, 2013, 4:39 AM PDT

    I have a friend that have a cyst on her ovary as big as a grapefruit, and it is hurting much. Can she use hot and cold bath? and for how long? What can she take for her pain? God bless you all, you are a bleesing to us.

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